Monthly Archives: October 2013

Four Seasons Garden Club donates to Corinth Library

garden club pic

by Cody Daniel, Assistant Corinth Librarian

The Four Seasons Garden Club of Corinth has recently donated educational films to the library.  Marte Shearin and Jean Redders were the representatives of the club who made the donation, and the Corinth Library got a chance to speak with them about it.  According to Redders, the club’s president, the Four Seasons Garden Club seeks to increase awareness and enjoyment of various horticultural topics; this year, their primary focus has been on topics of an agricultural nature.

Shearin was a recent program presenter for the club, and she chose to focus on honeybees—specifically “Colony Collapse Disorder,” a recent phenomenon in which honeybees are mysteriously disappearing from their hives.  According to researchers, this disappearance could profoundly affect the abilities of bees to pollinate, which could have adverse effects on food crops.

The films that the Garden Club donated explore the possible reasons for Colony Collapse Disorder, the potential problems it could cause for the environment, as well as corrective measures that people can take to help solve the issue.

The three documentaries include Vanishing of the Bees (narrated by Ellen Page), Queen of the Sun, and Silence of the Bees, produced by PBS.

Shearin mentioned that Albert Einstein once said of bees:  “If the bee disappears off the surface of the globe, then man would have only four years of life left.  No more bees, no more pollination, no more man.”

For those interested in learning more about this phenomenon, come to the Corinth Library and check out the documentaries!

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Library Lines from the GEA Library (Booneville)

by Dee Hare, Librarian

If your kids are getting anxious to dress up for Halloween fun at the end of the month, keep them happy while they’re waiting with some of the new materials we’ve recently received at the library.  They include:

Fly Guy is back in Tedd Arnold’s newest book Fly Guy and the Frankenfly.  In this 13th installment of the popular series, Buzz has a nightmare that his best friend Fly Guy has created a Frankenfly monster.  In Trick or Treat, Marley! by John Grogan, everyone’s favorite puppy tries to help with the family’s Halloween party.  Zombelina by Kristyn Crow stars a ballet dancing zombie girl who gets stage fright when her big night arrives.

Ready for Pumpkins by Kate Duke is the story of a classroom guinea pig who learns about gardening by growing his own pumpkin.  Creepy Carrots! by Aaron Reynolds finds carrot loving Jasper Rabbit stealing the fattest, crispest carrots he can find at Crackenhopper Field until they start following him home.  In  Monsters’ Monster by Patrick McDonnell, Grouch, Grump and little Gloom and Doom are constantly arguing about who is the “biggest and baddest” until they build a monster together that turns out to be bigger and badder than they expected.

The first two books in the “Monster High” series by Gitty Daneshvari for chapter book readers are here.  In Ghoulfriends Forever, we are introduced to Robecca Steam, Rochelle Goyle and Venus Mcflytrap as they begin to navigate cliques, classes and cute monster boys.  When popular classmates Frankie Stein and Cleo de Nile begin acting strangely, the girls must try to find time to figure out what is going on.  In Ghoulfriends Just Want to Have Fun, as if trying to pass classes like Mad Science, Ge-ogre-phy and Physical Deaducation wasnt hard enough, the group must solve the mystery of the sinister happenings at their school.

For slightly older readers, we have The 13th Sign by Kristin O’Donnell Tubb.  On her thirteenth birthday, Jalen unwittingly brings the twelve signs of the zodiac to life through an old book.  Soon she, her friend Ellie and Ellie’s brother Brennan are racing through the streets of New Orleans trying to defeat the twelve signs and their mysterious human companions.

We look forward to seeing everyone soon at the library.

 

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Library Lines from the GEA Library (Booneville)

by Dee Hare, Librarian

            October is here!  The night time is starting to creep closer as the day time hours start to fade away.  The air outside is even finally getting a little chiller.  To get you in the spirit for spooky Halloween activities during this month, the library has lots of new fiction to set the mood.  Recent additions to our collection include:

Omens by Kelley Armstrong is the beginning of a new series that starts with an Ivy League graduate’s life shattering discovery that she was adopted at birth.  Her biological parents are two imprisoned serial killers whose proclaimed innocence she is compelled to investigate in a small Illinois town.

Codex Born by Jim C. Hines is the second novel in his “Magic Ex Libris” series.  This imaginative series is based on the idea that five hundred years ago, Johannes Guttenberg discovery the art of libriomancy, which allowed him to reach into books to create things from their pages.  Bodyguard Lena must now use her special powers against the enemies of Libriomancer Isaac Greenwood as she investigates the murder of two teen werewolves.

Laurell K. Hamilton’s Vampire Hunter Anita Blake must take on zombies in Affliction,   the 22nd installment of the series.  Anita uses her familiarity with zombies as she tries to figure out why Micah’s father is dying from an inexplicable flesh-rotting disease.

In Devil’s Night by Todd Ritter, Police Chief Kat Campbell is summoned in the middle of the night to the site of an intentional fire at the Perry Hollow museum.  As she is examining the murdered body of the curator, Kat glimpses her nemesis Henry Goll in the crowd, which prompts a harrowing race against time to capture him.

Real Wolfmen: True Encounters in Modern America is by researcher and news reporter Linda S. Godfrey, who has been studying the phenomenon exclusively for the last twenty years.  She describes nationwide sightings of upright, canine creatures and includes a through explanation of the nature and possible origins of these mysterious beasts.

We look forward to seeing everyone soon at the library.

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Library Lines from the GEA Library (Booneville)

by Dee Hare, Librarian

Wonderful new fiction in the young adult section that we’ve received at the library includes:

A Simple Song is a Christian fiction title by Melody Carson.  Katrina Yoder has the voice of an angel but her Amish parents believe that singing is prideful vanity.  So when Katrina wins a ticket to Hollywood to compete in a talent competition, her world is turned upside down.  Because now her father needs surgery to save his life and what if she could win the main prize?

Every Day by David Levithan is the story of A, who wakes up every day in a different person’s body and living a different person’s life.  Over the years, he’s learned to never get too attached to anyone he meets since it changes every day.  That is, until he wakes up in Justin’s body and falls in love with Justin’s girlfriend Rhiannon.

Frozen by Melissa de la Cruz (author of the popular “Blue Bloods” series) is the story of fifteen year old Cass, who lives in a world that has been wiped free of most of humanity thanks to a catastrophic disaster that has covered the earth with ice.  Finally yielding to the voice in her head, Cass sets out on a dangerous journey across a frozen sea to search for the mythical land of Blue.

In Adaptation by Malinda Lo, Reese and her debate team partner David must receive medical treatment at a secret government facility in the aftermath of a bizarre series of plane crashes caused by birds.  The pair becomes tangled in a conspiracy that seems to be linked to aliens and UFOs.

Etiquette and Espionage by Gail Carriger is set in an alternate England of 1851.  Spirited fourteen-year-old Sophorina is surprised to learn when she is enrolled in finishing school that she will be learning not only the fine arts of dance, dress and etiquette but also lessons in diversion, deceit and espionage.

We look forward to seeing everyone soon at the library.

 

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Library Lines from the GEA Library (Booneville)

by Dee Hare, Librarian

            Great new fiction that we’ve received at the library includes:

The Bones of Paris by Laurie King is set in 1929 Paris.  As a former officer with the American Bureau of Investigation looks into the disappearance of an American girl, he discovers links to other abductees and a series of murders.  The trail eventually leads him to an American expat community filled with dangerous adversaries as well as famous historical artists.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman is the story of the extraordinary Hempstock women – Lettie, her mother and her grandmother.  When otherworldly creatures are set loose on the world and a little boy’s life is threatened, these women must summon all their courage and cleverness to keep him safe.  But too quickly they find that his survival comes with a deadly price.

Second Watch by J. A. Jance finds J. P. Beaumont recovering from knee replacement surgery.  After a series of dreams takesd him back to his days in Vietnam and he is reminded of people and places he hasn’t thought about in years, J. P. is plunged into one of the most mind-blowing mysteries he has ever faced.

In Beloved Enemy by Eric Lustbader, Jack McClure is wrongly implicated in the murder of a high ranking Cabinet member. To defend his reputation, he must hunt down a rogue intelligence operative who has been feeding information to one of the most aggressive terrorists McClure has ever seen.

Other new titles by your favorite authors include Declan’s Cross by Carla Neggers, Robert B. Parker’s Wonderland by Ace Atkins, W is for Wasted by Sue Grafton, Nemesis by Bill Pronzini, Close Knit Killer by Maggie Sefton, Deceived by Randy Wayne White, The Heist by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg and The King’s Deception by Steve Berry.

We look forward to seeing everyone soon at the library.

 

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